Crazy old ladies, peculiar diabolism, Czarist spookery, and the science of German smut:

All that Money Can Buy (1941), in which a farmer sells his soul to the Devil, then hires Senator Daniel Webster to get him out of the contract…

The Devil Within Her (1975), in which failing to requite a midget’s love gets Joan Collins cursed with a killer baby…

The Horror of Frankenstein (1970), in which Hammer scores its first Epic Fail in appealing to the youth market of the 70’s…

The Leech Woman (1959), in which the lady never asked for a Fountain of Youth, but now that she’s got one, she intends to keep it…

Night of the Ghouls (1958), in which Ed Wood brings the art of the “Dracula” anagram to its all-time low…

The Portrait (1915), in which there are even worse hazards to buying tacky wall art than having to spend the rest of your days looking at the ugly-ass thing…

The Queen of Spades (1916), in which Satan recommends that you cheat at cards…

Satan Exultant (1917), in which he also recommends that you get drunk, paint sexy pictures, and screw your in-laws…

The School Girls (1970), in which the in-laws are apparently the only people whom Germany’s teenagers aren’t screwing…

Twister’s Revenge! (1987), in which nothing evens the score with a bunch of dumb rednecks like an intelligent, self-aware monster truck…

and…

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962), in which one of Old Timey Hollywood’s most famous feuds becomes the raw material for the second-most influential psycho-horror film of the 60’s.
 
 
 

El Santo rules the wasteland-- and also 1000 Misspent Hours and Counting.


Click to share:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • Reddit